Monthly Archives: December 2011

Issues in AUCC Statement on Academic Freedom Questioned

Quoted excerpt from Huffington Post (see below): “In 2011 the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) reached the distinguished age of one hundred! The presidents of AUCC’s member institutions celebrated their centennial this fall by approving a new … Continue reading

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Academic Librarianship Symposium: A Crisis or An Opportunity – Nov. 18 – Article Published

For those unable to attend the Nov. 18 symposium, a summary of the main themes and discussions have been published in Partnership: the Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research, vol. 6, no. 2 (2011) by the organizers … Continue reading

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Update on Burning of the Institut d’Egypte, Cairo

An email being distributed to the global community on the IFLA listserv about the fire at the Institut d’Egypte, Cairo : Dear Colleagues, You’ll find here information about the evolution of the salvage of this collection received from Thomas Schuler … Continue reading

Posted in Academic Librarianship, Egypt, IFLA and FAIFE | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

Congratulating Our Colleagues – Lynne Kutsukake

The translation by Lynne Kutsukake of the writings of the contemporary Japanese author Masuda Mizuko has been published; it is entitled Single Sickness and Other Stories (Cornell University East Asia Series, 2011) and distributed by University of Hawaii Press.  These … Continue reading

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Black Day for Egyptian Heritage – Oldest Scientific Library in Egypt and the Middle East Burns

The Egyptian Scientific Institute which established in 1798 by Napoleon Bonaparte has been burned. The fire started on Saturday December 17, 2011. The Egyptian Scientific Institute is the oldest scientific institute in Egypt and Middle East with a rare library collection. For more … Continue reading

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Banned or Threatened Books in the United States – Celebrating the Freedom to Read

Intellectual freedom is celebrated annually by the Banned Books Week, (next year Sept 30 – Oct 6, 2012) held each year in the fall. Do you think this is not relevant to college or university contexts? Think again. In the … Continue reading

Posted in Academic freedom, Academic Librarianship, ALA - American Library Association, Intellectual Freedom | 1 Comment

Is this something we should be thinking about? Deep Reading vs. Screen Reading?

In today’s Globe & Mail, Dec. 12, 2011, John Barber, examines recent studies on screen reading vs. what is being called deep reading – something to consider as educators and leaders in our fields: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/arts/books/books-vs-screens-which-should-your-kids-be-reading/article2268465/singlepage/

Posted in Academic Librarianship, Library Trends | 2 Comments

The consequences of political agendas in archives and libraries….

In the Globe & Mail, Dec.12, 2011, it was announced that Quebec will be suing Ottawa over the recent decision to destroy records of the gun registry housed in the Library and Archives Canada “Information Commissioner Suzanne Legault warned that … Continue reading

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“Getting the Most out of Academic Libraries – and Librarians”

Article on current levels of student proficiency at being able to assess, critically, electronic resources – nothing new, but reaffirms current views: http://chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2011/10/18/getting-the-most-out-of-academic-libraries%E2%80%94and-librarians/

Posted in Academic Librarianship | 1 Comment

Ex-UofT President, Robert J. Birgeneau in the News

F.Y.I. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2011/11/30/EDUS1M6A15.DTL#ixzz1fKrmkvno

Posted in Historical Bits and Bytes, University of Toronto | Leave a comment